Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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Safety in Lactation: HIV infection

Breastfeeding by HIV-positive mothers may cause HIV infection in the infant and should be avoided where possible. The use of HIV drugs during breastfeeding is…

Safety in Lactation: Immunoglobulins

Immunoglobulins are considered to be compatible with breastfeeding and may contribute to the transfer of protective antibodies to the neonate.

Safety in Lactation: Influenza

Data are limited regarding the use of oseltamivir and zanamivir during breastfeeding, although both would be considered compatible; oseltamivir is the preferred choice. If an…

Safety in Lactation: Inhalational anaesthetics

The effects of inhalational anaesthetics are short-lived. Levels of these drugs in milk are anticipated to be negligible. It is therefore considered that breastfeeding can…

Safety in Lactation: Insulins

Exogenous insulin is excreted into breast milk, including that from insulin analogues. Insulin in breast milk is thought to be necessary for intestinal maturation of…

Safety in Lactation: Intravenous anaesthetics

The effects of intravenous anaesthetics are short-lived. Levels of these drugs in milk are very low. It is therefore considered that breastfeeding can be resumed…

Safety in Lactation: Leishmaniacides

Sodium stibogluconate is used for visceral leishmaniasis. The dosage varies depending on geographical region and expert advice should be sought. Amphotericin (5.2.3) and pentamidine isethionate…

Safety in Lactation: Local anaesthesia

Local anaesthetics are generally considered to be compatible with breastfeeding. They are used in a variety of clinical situations (surgery including Caesarean sections, labour and…
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